Extreme Ice Survey – Is the most wide-ranging glacier study ever conducted using ground-based, real-time photography.

Posted: February 20, 2010 in Environment
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“EIS uses time-lapse photography, conventional photography, and video to document the rapid changes now occurring on the Earth’s glacial ice. The EIS team has installed 27 time-lapse cameras at 15 sites in Greenland, Iceland, Alaska, and the Rocky Mountains. EIS supplements this ongoing record with annual repeat photography in Iceland, the Alps, and Bolivia.”

In 2005, internationally acclaimed nature photojournalist James Balog travelled to Iceland to photograph glaciers for The New Yorker. This led to a 2006 National Geographic assignment to document changing glaciers in various parts of the world. In the course of shooting that story (which became the June 2007 cover story, “The Big Thaw”), Balog, who in addition to being a photographer is a mountaineer with a graduate degree in geomorphology, recognized that extraordinary amounts of ice were vanishing with shocking speed. Features that took centuries to develop were being destroyed in just a few years or even just a few weeks. These changes are the most visually dramatic and immediate manifestations of climate change on our planet today.

“The Extreme Ice Survey is honored to feature their own layer of photos and time-lapse videos with Google Earth.”

Find out more : http://www.extremeicesurvey.org/

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