Archive for the ‘USB Devices’ Category

Do you need to access files from other computers in your home wireless network, or perhaps you need to transfer data from one device to another?

Then the Iomega iConnect Wireless Data Station could be your calling. Introduced in January and available in the shops now, the device runs on a Linux platform and allows you to stream files to your device of choice, with the backing of the DLNA standards.

A couple of useful features include :

Torrent Download Manager, the Iomega iConnect manages peer-to-peer file transfers without the need of a dedicated PC.

You can also transfer files from one device to another using the on board copy process. Again transferring photos from your camera is a pc free process, using the Picture Transfer Protocol (PTP), no touch, automatic transfer of photos from digital cameras via the USB port.

My only concern is with USB3 around the corner, is it really worth investing a device with 4 USB2 ports right now?

However, the price in the UK currently is on average £60, which doesn’t break the bank if it solves some of your digital needs. And when people ask you, “Hey, is that your router?”

You can say “No….that’s my data station.”

Find out more about the Iomega iConnect Wireless Data Station at :

http://go.iomega.com/en-us/products/network-storage-desktop/wireless-data-station/network-hard-drive-iconnect/?partner=4760#tech_specsItem_tab

If are looking for ways to access files across your network then look at :

https://vyber.wordpress.com/2010/03/01/social-usb-mass-storage/

https://vyber.wordpress.com/2010/03/10/boxee-a-social-open-source-media-center/

Read more about the DNLA at :

http://www.dlna.org/industry/home

Purchase the Iomega iConnect from Expansys at :

http://www.expansys.com/d.aspx?i=196377&partner=froogle

The Pogoplug has been around now for a couple of years, after being introduced to the world at the CES Las Vegas 2008. It combines the features of a USB mass storage device with access to a supporting website.  So you can back your files automatically as usual but here’s the interesting part. You can access files remotely via the web or invite friends and share files with them, without them even having to join.

Pogoplug supports PCs, Macs &  Linux, but also allows mobile phone access via a website. Allowing users to access their files via a phone application and being able to share files with friends on Facebook, MySpace & Twitter makes the Pogoplug an very interesting solution, please check the latest from the site to see if your phone is currently supported.

The colour is my only real gripe about this product, but that can easily be fixed.

For some FAQs take a look at : http://www.pogoplugged.com/page/faq

Content below courtesy of www.pogoplugged.com

What Is Pogoplug?

The Pogoplug

The Pogoplug connects your USB drive to the Internet so you can easily share and access your files from anywhere.

The Pogoplug is the perfect accessory to your connected life.

Imagine accessing all your files and media at home from any laptop or desktop computer, anywhere in the world, or sharing this content with friends and family without having to upload. There’s even an iPhone application so you can always “phone home” to get your files!

If you are interested in looking at other ways to access files across your home network then you might want to take a look at :

https://vyber.wordpress.com/2010/03/12/got-a-network-files-and-drives-on-the-increase-have-you-considered-a-data-station/

https://vyber.wordpress.com/2010/03/10/boxee-a-social-open-source-media-center/


Recently I organised 20GB of digital photos taken from the last 12 years, took a few days.

I need to start on the negatives.

With useful devices like this USB Negative Film Scanner, the process of backing up those priceless negatives with a digital version sounds good for those of us they don’t own a scanner with the negative add on feature.

Here’s an example from Gadgets.co.uk :

New model of Scanner now available. Windows Vista and Mac compatible, will also scan 110 negatives as well as 35mm negatives and slides.

Back in the dark ages, before the advent of digital cameras, there was the whole big hassle of loading film into camera, only having a limited number of photos per film, and no way to see if what you were taking photo’s of was being captured in glorious colour, or just a big blurry blob, thank goodness we don’t have to put up with that anymore! Read more…